Web Masters Episode 4: Linda Lightman

Below is a transcription of  Web Masters Episode 4: Linda Lightman. To learn more about Web Masters and subscribe, check out the Web Masters podcast page.



Shop Linda's Stuff

Linda Lightman:

I remember it like it was yesterday. My children wanted to sell their video games and we went to the local store where we were going to trade the games that we probably spent like $50 to $65 on and get money for those games. The store was offering us $5 for these games that were like 65 bucks. My son said, “Let’s put them on eBay.” There was no computer in my office. When I was a lawyer, I took pictures on a camera with film, so I don’t want to date myself, but I guess I am. Digital cameras were not part of my lexicon, if you will. I said, “Okay, let’s do it.”

We put the kids’ video games on eBay. It was kind of like a project for all of us. We put them on eBay and they were selling for 40 bucks, not the $5 that was being offered to me by the store. I was kind of hooked on this process. I was engaging with people all over the world. I was selling the kids’ video games. The kids were so thrilled. They were making so much money. When the games that they were willing to sell depleted, I found myself feeling like, wow, I want to continue this. How can I continue this?

Fashion was always my passion, and I decided to start selling the designer clothing, shoes, and accessories that I had that I was previously taking to a local consignment shop when I no longer wanted, needed, or was wearing those items. I went outside in my backyard and I hung my clothing on my outdoor furniture. I wanted to make it look really pretty. I wasn’t trained. I didn’t grow up in the age of computers. I didn’t grow up in the age of digital cameras, but I taught myself and I took pictures of my clothing and people were buying them.

Aaron Dinin:

Did you notice the excitement in her voice when she said, “And people were buying them”? Let’s hear it again.

Linda Lightman:

I took pictures of my clothing and people were buying them.

Aaron Dinin:

That’s the sound of what entrepreneurs sometimes call a light bulb moment. It’s one of those misunderstood concepts in entrepreneurship. People usually think a light bulb moment is a brilliant idea, a moment of inspiration or a stroke of genius. It’s not. A light bulb moment is when you run a mini experiment or test a small theory you have, and the results were better than you’d imagined. In your head, you find yourself saying, “Wow, I can’t believe how well that worked. I think I need to try it again.” And so you do.

Linda Lightman:

I even started going to Marshall’s or local outlets and buying things so that I could sell them. I was really hooked on it, and friends started to hear about what I was doing. I always say this and I stand behind it, but word of mouth is probably the most powerful tool, and there was no social media. This was like, oh, my friends from law school in New York were hearing about what I was doing and said, “I’m going to send you my stuff. Can you sell it for me?” Sure. A business was born.

Aaron Dinin:

That business is called Linda’s Stuff. The person you just heard talking about it as the founder, Linda Lightman, and this is the story of how she turned an experiment to help her kids sell their video games on eBay into a $25 million per year global fashion mini empire. Are you ready to hear her story? Great. Let’s get dialed in.

[INTRO MUSIC]

Aaron Dinin:

Hey there, and welcome to Web Masters; the podcast where we hear from some of the earliest internet innovators and entrepreneurs. I’m your host, Aaron Dinin. I’m part of Duke University’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Initiative. I teach entrepreneurship classes, I study the history of the internet and internet businesses and before all that stuff, I used to build venture backed tech companies. Yeah, I’m the kind of person who thinks stories about internet entrepreneurship are really cool. If you do too, you’re going to love today’s episode with Linda Lightman, founder and CEO of Linda’s Stuff. Linda actually started selling on eBay from her home in 2000, when the platform is only a few years old. The business has outgrown her house a little bit since then. She’s now operating out of a 100,000 square foot warehouse, and she’s the biggest seller of designer fashion on eBay worldwide, but before she can explain how she got there, I need to explain to you how you might be able to get there one day too.

If selling with sites and tools like eBay and Amazon and Shopify interests you, then you should check out my wonderful sponsor for this podcast, Latona’s. Latona’s is a boutique mergers and acquisitions company that specializes in buying and selling cashflow positive internet businesses like well, eBay stores and Amazon FBAs, not to mention content website, SaaS applications, domain portfolios, and all the other types of online businesses we explore here on Web Masters. If you want a head start on becoming the next Linda Lightman, check out latonas.com to see what kinds of already profitable e-commerce businesses they’re selling right now, or hey, maybe you were already on your way to becoming the next Linda Lightman, but you’ve decided it’s time to cash out, maybe make a change, try something new. Whatever, that’s cool. Latona’s can help you too. They specialize in helping internet entrepreneurs get top dollar for their online businesses. To learn more about how you can buy your next internet business or sell the one you’ve already got, check out latonas.com. That’s L-A-T-O-N-A-S.com.

When you do check out Latona’s, which you’re going to do, right, I think you’re going to be surprised to see how many people have built entire businesses on top of platforms like eBay, as well as Amazon and Etsy and similar types of marketplaces. It can seem a bit weird at first glance because those sites are, themselves, enormous companies, but fundamentally, eBay’s business isn’t about selling products to consumers. eBay’s business is about creating a valuable marketplace for sellers like Linda, and that lets her sell her stuff, and of course in Linda’s case, lots of other people’s stuff, to those consumers that eBay has built. That means a lot of what Linda focuses on is acquiring stuff she can sell at a profit. Luckily, as she’s going to explain, this particular scale is one she’s been honing for quite some time.

Linda Lightman:

I was a lawyer at a large firm, and I remember Bonwit Teller was going out of business, and Bonwit Teller, for those of you who don’t know, was a very large department store, much like Lauren Taylor going out of business right now. Bonwit Teller was closing their stores and I wanted to be at that sale. God knows what I would have found. It was all about the hunt for me back in the day. I guess that hunt is what it is now for people selling on eBay. It’s finding that treasure. I put my blazer on my chair and I wrote a note, “In the library doing research”, but I was searching that sale. Now it’s so much easier. We could go online. We could see, but then we didn’t have that opportunity. That just shows you what my passion was. It wasn’t about doing legal research.

Aaron Dinin:

Notice how Linda isn’t really talking about the items she was buying at the sales. She’s not describing a specific type of designer handbag or a specific brand of clothing. Linda is obsessed with the value of what she’s getting. The quote unquote treasures she’s alluding to aren’t treasures purely because they’re valuable objects. They’re treasures because the cost of acquiring those objects are significantly less than their usual costs. This is what makes eBay an attractive marketplace for someone like Linda. She’s already great at figuring out how to obtain something for cheap, and eBay makes it easy for her to sell those same items for more money. This is called price arbitrage, and it’s a concept Linda was exposed to at an early age.

Linda Lightman:

I guess my role model would be my parents. My dad is an entrepreneur. He worked for a company selling the tags that are on clothing, that when you go through the alarm systems, and then he realized, wait a minute, I don’t need to work for this company doing this. I could sell used tags to these stores. He started his own company selling the tags and really found that niche. He’s still somebody that I call for advice. He’s somebody that I share my success, I share my failures and I seek advice from him. What can I learn and how can I do better? He’s always there for me, which has been great.

Aaron Dinin:

Now, the fact that Linda’s father found a way to acquire used clothing security tags for cheap and then sell them at a profit might not seem like a big deal, but it actually aligns with a pattern I’ve noticed as I do more of the interviews for this podcast. It turns out most of the entrepreneurs I’ve spoken with grew up with some sort of entrepreneurial role model in their homes. I bring this up because I think there’s a relationship between being exposed to entrepreneurship at a young age and then pursuing a price arbitrage business as one of your first entrepreneurial ventures.

For example, a common manifestation I’ve seen of this pattern is the kid in middle school who realizes she can buy a box of Skittles at Costco for 50 cents per pack, and then turn around and sell those same Skittle packs at her school to all our friends for a dollar each. That kid almost always comes from a household with an entrepreneurial parent. Eventually what happens is they usually move to other business models and that’s largely because there’s really only so much money you can make selling Skittles, but Linda’s story is a bit different because her price arbitrage experiment didn’t happen until she was older. At the time, she was actually pursuing a more traditional career path.

Linda Lightman:

When I was in college and graduating college, traditional success at that time looked like being a lawyer, being a doctor, working at an investment bank. It wasn’t defined by entrepreneurship. Now entrepreneurship is such a big part of our business world and what small businesses do for our country is such a huge part of our economy. I recently spoke at my law school. They have an entrepreneurship program there now. They didn’t have that when I was at law school and I sure wish they did. I think that would have made a greater impact on me.

Aaron Dinin:

In other words, Linda grew up at a time when the term entrepreneur was like a polite euphemism for unemployed. That’s just not what success looked like, but hearing her story, I kind of wonder if this actually worked to her advantage by that. By that, it seems kind of like it allowed her to discover the opportunity in price arbitrage at an age when she could afford to put enough resources into it to make it a viable business strategy. Now to explain what I mean, I’ll reveal a bit about my background.

Right around the time Linda was first starting to sell designer clothes and accessories on eBay, I was launching my first business on eBay too. Now I discovered I could scour eBay’s newest buy it now listings for great deals on electronics like laptops and PalmPilots, buy them for cheap and then resell the same items back on eBay a days few later, usually for somewhere between a $50 and $100 profit, but while Linda went on to become one of the biggest eBay sellers in the world, I’m, well, doing a podcast about her, so clearly one of us was more successful than the other.

I’m guessing a big factor in that success was access to resources. When Linda and I both got our starts on eBay, I was in college, so the money I was making, it felt like great pocket money, but I never had enough cash to flip more than maybe $1,000 or $2,000 worth of product, so it wasn’t ultimately very scalable. Linda, on the other hand, was a bit farther in her career. She was already a salary lawyer and her husband was a Wall Street trader. This meant Linda had resources to buy more product on her own that she could then arbitrage on eBay. That’s exactly what she did. She started seeking out more product to sell. She did this first by shopping on her own at local outlets.

Linda Lightman:

Marshall’s or local outlets.

Aaron Dinin:

Then by enabling her friends to sell…

Linda Lightman:

My friends from law school in New York were hearing about what I was doing and said, “I’m going to send you my stuff. Can you sell it for me?”

Aaron Dinin:

Then she started helping strangers sell their stuff on eBay.

Linda Lightman:

Our business was selling for people like you, Aaron. You cleaned out your closet, you sent in your stuff.

Aaron Dinin:

And eventually by partnering directly with brands.

Linda Lightman:

Now it’s grown into selling for industry, selling for manufacturers, selling for designers, selling for retailers. We work with some of the largest online retailers that you can imagine. I’m under NDA, so I can’t say who they are, but we work with some of the largest retailers and they send us their liquidation. We are a great resource for them, so that’s been wonderful. I say this and I mean it. I’ve really grown up with eBay and I’ve definitely, for better or worse, hitched my wagon to eBay. Some people call me the queen of eBay. Don’t necessarily love that, but I realized early on that there was a business to be had.

Aaron Dinin:

How cool is that growth story? Linda caught the eBay wave at the right time in both her life and the company’s life. eBay, it kind of started as a platform that was sort of like the internet’s garage sale, but it matured into one of the world’s largest e-commerce marketplaces. As eBay matured, Linda got to grow with it, but of course it wasn’t really that easy.

Linda Lightman:

I started selling on eBay, told you about the kids’ video games, and then I morphed into selling my own stuff and people started sending me stuff. For years, my business was in my house. I wish I had pictures of it. Every ounce of my house was taken up by stuff that we were selling on eBay. Every ounce. It was like crazy. My kids would leave for school in the morning and the employees would come when the kids left for school and the kids would come home from school and my employees were still in our house. To me, this was like a hobby, but yet it was not a hobby and it took me a long time to realize that it was a business.

I tell a story and this is true. My one son was studying for his bar mitzvah and he had to chant portions of the Torah to a tape recording, but there were people in his bedroom working, so they were working and he was practicing for his bar mitzvah at the same time. Kind of maybe not my best parental moment, but that’s the way it was and the business evolved. Then we realized, gosh, our neighbors started to complain about the cars and we realized that we had to move the business out of the house. We moved the business to a 5,000 square foot warehouse. I remember we moved in there and I thought, oh my gosh, we are never going to outgrow this space. This is unbelievable. Two years later we outgrow it and it was terrible. We had the fire marshal coming and we had stuff everywhere, and we moved into a 12,000 square foot warehouse. Two years later, 25,000 square feet. Two years later, 58,000, and then we expanded that and now we’re at 93,000 square feet.

Aaron Dinin:

Linda’s story about how she scaled from her house to an enormous warehouse is amazing for all sorts of reasons, but the thing I’m most interested in, at least in terms of this podcast, is the analog nature of everything she’s describing. Let’s remember, Linda Lightman is one of the biggest eBay sellers in the entire world. In other words, she is the model of an internet entrepreneur. Isn’t it a bit strange that the actual work of running her business has very little to do with, well, the internet? For as much as the internet and worldwide web have impacted businesses, what they’ve mostly impacted is the user experience. The actual work of operating a business isn’t all that different than it was 50 or 100 years ago. Sure, you got different technologies enabling and streamlining workflows, but in a lot of cases, running an internet business and being an internet entrepreneur is still mostly about logistics, operations, team management, customer service, and all those kinds of things that are decidedly non-techie.

Linda Lightman:

There’s about 177 million buyers, unique buyers, on eBay at any given time. I think it’s important to build the trust of the buying community, and you build the trust by providing a good experience from soup to nuts, whether it’s the pictures that you take, it’s answering questions from potential buyers. If you ask a question, we’re going to be there to answer that question. We also give a phone number. I am a believer in letting people know that there’s real people out there to help. How frustrating is it for all of us when we buy something online and there’s no phone number? You’re struggling with that purchase and you want to reach out to somebody.

Aaron Dinin:

Okay. We got phone numbers with real people answering. That means Linda has to employ lots of customer service agents. Let’s see who else she’s employing.

Linda Lightman:

Well, I get consignment from you and I process it. Then I send you an inventory and I give you a code that you can watch your items sell on eBay. That’s exciting stuff, right? To see the items that you no longer want, use or wear and watch them sell. That’s awesome.

Aaron Dinin:

A custom tracking process for her consigners, that means she’s got a tech team building and maintaining an inventory system.

Linda Lightman:

Then how our bookkeeping pays you on those items.

Aaron Dinin:

She’s got thousands of people sending her stuff to sell. Of course, they want to get paid. That means bookkeepers and accountants on staff.

Linda Lightman:

How do we ship those items? In the early days, my kids would come home from school and my husband and my kids would go with piles like this. I’m showing a huge pile to the post office and line up and ship all the items.

Aaron Dinin:

Of course, she couldn’t have her husband and children making post office runs for the rest of their lives, so she had to hire warehouse workers. The same was true for Linda, who was originally the person taken all the pictures. That may have worked when she was selling a few items a week or even a few items a day, but what happened as Linda’s customers began selling more and more stuff through her?

Linda Lightman:

People who used to work for us listing would list like 50 products a day. Now they list 150 to 200 products a day. Our photographers take 800 pictures a day; 800 pictures a day. That’s pretty crazy.

Aaron Dinin:

That means Linda has teams of photographers working for her. Those are just some of the jobs her employees are doing, and very few of them are the kinds of jobs most people would associate with an internet business, which just goes to show that the term internet business doesn’t mean staring at a computer screen all day. It really just means your customers are staring at a screen. On the other side of that screen, you’re doing whatever you can to service those customers. Of course, that could mean something techie like writing code, but it could also mean running around a warehouse, photographing, packaging and shipping products.

Linda Lightman:

I think that’s what being a good entrepreneur is all about is knowing how to pivot, how to evolve, how to change with the times. Then I first started, it was taking pictures outside. I didn’t know anything about studio lighting. I thought that the only way that you could get a good picture was being outside in the natural light. I learned. I learned about studio lighting. I learned how to bring that process indoors because I live in the northeast and in the winter we weren’t taking pictures and I hired, went online and put ads at colleges, local colleges for employees. I went to a photography school and hired a photographer.

First, when I hired my employees, we were working out of my house. I told them, “You have to take the pictures outside.” Again, I was convinced that that was the only way and it was winter. I remember they were outside with gloves and hats taking pictures. Then as the business evolved and I hired people who knew more than me and taught me so much, and I think that’s also really important is being able to learn from the people that you work with. Knowing that you don’t know everything and you’re going to take advice from other people. They know a lot and the help that I’ve had from the students that I’ve hired, there’s no value I could put on that. It’s been incredible.

Aaron Dinin:

Yeah, that does sound pretty incredible, but it couldn’t have all been great, right? Could you maybe share some bumps along the way aside from logistics of managing and operating a global shipping operation? What have been some of the, I guess, the biggest challenges you faced?

Linda Lightman:

There are so many nuances to selling. It’s very laborious. People think, oh, this is so easy. It’s really not. It’s a very touch business. I have to get the garments, I have to measure them, I have to see the condition. I also just want to back up one other second. For us, we have two arms of our business. I look at it as a pendulum. We have consigners and we have buyers and we have to please both. We have to get merchandise from consigners and then we sell it to buyers, and we have to please the buyers and we want to create a very positive buying experience so that these buyers will come back, but we also want to create a good experience for the consigners because they’re our bread and butter. Without the inventory, we don’t have the buyers.

It’s a balance. For us, it’s learning how to sell internationally, how to ship internationally, how to make sure that all the goods that you’re selling are authentic. In the world that we live in today, that’s a very big concern. How do you authenticate? That’s a very big part of our business. You get a Chanel handbag. How do you know it’s real? While I’m pretty good at being able to tell if a Gucci handbag or a Chanel handbag is authentic, I learned early on that while my ability and me imparting that knowledge on my team is wonderful, it’s not good enough.

I think buyers want that stamp of approval. They want to know that an expert looked at that and is signing off. For us, I decided I’m not going to make that a core competency of Linda’s Stuff. I’m going to rely on experts in the field and I’m going to figure out a way that we can send these other entrepreneurs these authenticators. it’s entrepreneurs helping entrepreneurs. Send them pictures of handbags or sneakers or watches and let them give their stamp of approval so that my buyers have that confidence, that they know that what they’re buying is authentic. For me, it’s all about creating a good buying experience, creating a great consigner experience, taking great pictures, knowing how to price an item, researching what the market will bear for that item, shipping fast and free, if possible, answering questions from potential buyers. It’s a big picture. It’s a lot. There’s a lot of boxes to check.

Aaron Dinin:

So in my mind and from my experience, authenticity seems like a really big challenge for a company like yours. If you’re selling Chanel and Prada and Gucci and Cartier and you’re on a platform like eBay that I think people are already a bit skittish of in terms of seller reliability, how does that impact your business?

Linda Lightman:

Back in the day, people thought eBay was rife with inauthentic goods. I think eBay did a wonderful job cleaning up the site. It’s not like, oh, you go on eBay and it’s fakes. eBay has authentic goods and they’ve done a great job, better than any other platform, weeding those inauthentic items off the site. eBay started a handbag authentication program where they stood behind the authentication. If you were a verified seller in the authentication program and somebody purchased a handbag and then said it was inauthentic, eBay stood behind that. Now they have it for watches and it’s really incredible. They have verified sellers. If you are a seller and you are conscientious and you’re a valued seller selling watches, you have to do all the things that would make you verified, show that you’re authenticating these watches and how you authenticate them and what’s your process. They’re standing behind those purchases and that’s pretty incredible.

Aaron Dinin:

Yeah. I can see that and appreciate the value of eBay having that, but in my mind, this is really one of the biggest differences between buying from someone like you on eBay versus buying from, say, kind of a more private seller. Even though, yes, I’m using eBay, you’re basically your own company that exists outside of eBay, right? Linda’s Stuff is its own brand, and having that brand gives me, as the consumer, confidence in what I’m buying. It’s like I’m buying from Macy’s.

Linda Lightman:

Aaron, first of all, thank you for thinking of us as a brand. I like to think of us as a brand too; that we’re not just a seller. We’re like a brand selling on eBay and the brand is Linda’s Stuff, and I think you build the brand by working hard and working hard is being dedicated to the details, making sure that you answer questions. I work all the time and I don’t want to stop working. I love it. It keeps me going, and I think the thing I’m most proud about that I’ve evolved with is my process. The process that you build is the infrastructure for your business. It’s how do I get goods from consigners and take them in and barcode them, and how do I know that this came from Aaron? How does Aaron get his inventory and how does Aaron get paid? How do I authenticate Aaron’s goods and ship Aaron back the items that we can’t accept? Then how am I shipping to all of these people all over the world? What does that look like? It’s a machine here.

Aaron Dinin:

Notice how Linda describes her business as a machine. For me, that’s entrepreneurship in its purest form. It’s not about creating and selling awesome products. Look at Linda. She doesn’t technically have a product of her own to sell. She’s literally selling other people’s stuff. It’s right there in the name of her company, but that doesn’t matter because entrepreneurship isn’t about creating products. It’s about building a customer monetization machine. Yes, you’re going to have to sell something at some point, but the thing you’re selling isn’t as important as the machinery you’ve built to sell it. That’s where the real value is, because once you have that machine, you can deploy it in other ways with other products and in other verticals to continue growing your business. In fact, that’s exactly what Linda is doing right now with the ever-growing Linda’s Stuff machine that she’s already built.

Linda Lightman:

We do multi-channel selling. We sell on eBay. We do not sell on Amazon. We sell on our own e-commerce site. We sell designer handbags. You know those sites Rue La La and Gilt? We curate the handbag sales, the vintage and luxury handbag sales, for both of those sites. Currently we’re doing a sale on Rue La La right now and when you go on, it’ll say like vintage and luxury picks by Linda’s Stuff. We curate a shop for them of really beautiful designer handbags and we sell on their site. A guy who was a big fashion exec at eBay left, and is now working for another company in China. We just launched on that site, so there are some really exciting things going on.

Aaron Dinin:

Out of curiosity, what about eBay? Is there still room to grow on there or do you think you’ve done pretty much everything you can?

Linda Lightman:

I’m very bullish on eBay. I think that eBay has been a great partner for me. I love selling on eBay. I love that I’ve grown up with eBay. I sound like a commercial for eBay, but eBay’s been good to me. I can’t complain. I’m talking about eBay as a platform. I’ve grown a business selling on eBay, so I think that eBay is really back to its roots. I think that people are really buying and people are still always looking for that unique item, whether you’re a collector, whether you’re a treasure hunter, I think that eBay offers a platform that cannot be found anywhere else.

Aaron Dinin:

Okay. Lots more growth to be had on eBay and lots more growth to be had elsewhere too. What about venture capital? Would you ever consider growing that way?

Linda Lightman:

20 years ago, when I started this business, there was nobody else. There was no ThreadUp or Poshmark or The RealReal. It was me, and I did not take venture capital money. Whether or not that was a poor decision, I don’t know. I just know that I built the business working hard, sweat equity I call it, while others then popped up and took tons of venture money and grew their business that way. We didn’t go that route, but then I’ve seen failures too. I’ve seen businesses that got tons of venture money in my space and I’ve seen them come and go. They’re there too. Did I make a mistake? People ask me that all the time. I don’t know.

Aaron Dinin:

Considering where Linda is now, it seems hard to say she did anything wrong. Well, unless you ask her about her company’s name, Linda’s Stuff.

Linda Lightman:

When I started selling it, I called the company Linda’s Stuff. If I knew it was going to be the behemoth that it is now, I certainly would never have called the company Linda’s Stuff, but that’s history. It doesn’t matter. You can’t change it.

Aaron Dinin:

Honestly, I like the name Linda’s Stuff. It tells you what you need to know. Linda is selling stuff and boy, does she sell a lot of it. More importantly, at least to me, is that it points to the history of what she’s built and how she built it. That’s actually a big part of why we’re hearing her story today. You see, I was on eBay a few weeks ago looking for a replacement strap for a watch and I kept getting spooked away by sellers that made me worried I might be getting something that wasn’t genuine. Then I came across a strap I liked, looked up the seller, saw she had nearly a million positive reviews. I knew I could trust what I was buying. That seller was Linda Lightman.

Of course, when I started Googling her, I discovered her incredible story and thought it was exactly the kind of early internet entrepreneurship story we’re sharing with all of you, and I hope you’ve enjoyed learning about it as much as I enjoyed researching it. If you have, I’m going to ask you to do me a tiny favor and head over to your favorite podcast platform of choice and write us a five star review. It’ll only take you a couple of minutes and it really helps us as we continue trying to grow the podcast and reach more people. While you’re there, be sure to subscribe so you get the next episode as soon as it’s available.

Before we wrap up, I want to thank our wonderful guest Linda Lightman of Linda’s Stuff for very graciously agreeing to hop on a call with some crazy customer claiming to have a podcast and wanting to interview her. You can get all the stuff she’s currently selling at shoplindasstuff.com and of course you can search for Linda’s Stuff on eBay. You won’t have any trouble finding it.

I also want to thank our sound engineer, Ryan Higgs, for all his work, putting together today’s episode.

And I want to thank our amazing sponsor, Latona’s. In a way, Latona’s is kind of like the Linda’s Stuff of digital assets. They’re experts at helping you package and list your digital assets so you can get top dollar for them. If that’s something that interests you, be sure to check out latonas.com.

As always, you can reach out to us on Twitter. We’re at WebMasterPod. I’m on Twitter too @AaronDinin. That’s A-A-R-O-N D-I-N-I-N. I also write lots of articles about startups, entrepreneurship, and internet businesses over on medium.com, so search for my name over there. You’re going to find all those articles and that should keep you busy with lots of great content until we release our next episode in just a few days, but for now, I guess it’s time for me to sign off.

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