Web Masters Episode #13: Bo Peabody

In the late 90s, Bo Peabody launched a “homepage builder” called Tripod as an experiment. It went viral literally overnight, and Bo became known as an entrepreneurial wunderkind. But was it skill and smarts that helped Bo reach the pinnacle of startup success? Or was it just dumb luck?¬†Find out on this episode of Web Masters.



Dot Solo - Kelana Di Rantau

Bo Peabody:

So originally we wanted to build a online magazine for college students and young people that was like the MTV of the internet. What happened is that we were just seeing what worked, and one night the developer said to me, “Hey, we built this thing called the homepage builder, and we want to put it up.” And I thought it doesn’t really have anything to do with our business, but sure. Why not put it up on the side and see what happens? We were just trying anything. And the next day we came in and the servers are just spinning, and it had gone viral and everybody found us. And then we went from being a publisher of content to allowing others to publish. That moment is the moment of the internet. That’s what makes social media interesting. You don’t have to produce all the content. People will produce it for you. And that was when the business took off.

Aaron Dinin:

So it was all luck that you built this huge company. It was just lucky that you had a developer who built something that went viral like that.

Bo Peabody:

Yeah, I wrote a book back in 2005 called Lucky Or Smart? I wrote that book for one reason, and that was to set the record straight on what happened because I got celebrated in every magazine on every television show. I was all over the place as this wonder kid who created this thing. And fact is it was mostly luck. Now the point I make in the book is that you can be good at creating luck, and you create luck by getting a lot of smart people around an idea and letting them be creative and not blocking their ability to do things. And that I was very good at. I created serendipity or the atmosphere that serendipity could happen. And that’s what led to the homepage builder. And if it wasn’t the homepage builder, it could have been something else.

I mean none of the companies that I’ve started have really ended where they began. They’ve all been pivots and it’s just about keeping smart people around you and then it appears lucky. And it is in some ways, but you have to create the circumstance for luck. And a lot of people aren’t good at that.

Aaron Dinin:

This episode’s guest is definitely not one of those people. His name is Bo Peabody. He’s the founder of a company you’ve probably heard of if you were looking to build a homepage for yourself in the late ’90s. It was called Tripod. And at its peak, it was the eighth most popular website in the world. Now did Bo really just get lucky with it or was there some smarts involved too? That’s what we’re going to explore today. Are you ready to hear that story? Great. Let’s get dialed in.

[INTRO]

Aaron Dinin:

Hi, I’m Aaron Dinin and this is Web Masters, the podcast where we learn about entrepreneurship by talking with people who have built some of the most successful and impactful businesses in internet history. In case you’re wondering why I would spend my hours compiling these stories, it’s because I teach innovation and entrepreneurship at Duke University. And to me, the early days of the internet offer a fascinating glimpse into the way innovation happens. Today’s guest, Bo Peabody, founder of Tripod is going to allow us to explore one of the trickiest questions to answer in the world of entrepreneurship. How much of a company success is a product of things like intelligence and skill and knowledge, and how much of success comes from pure dumb luck?

But before we can get to that, lucky for me, this podcast has an incredible sponsor. And lucky for you, I’m going to tell you all about it right now. I wouldn’t be able to share such amazing stories on Web Masters if it wasn’t for the help of our sponsor Latona’s. Latona’s is a boutique Mergers and Acquisitions company that specializes in the buying and selling of cashflow positive internet businesses and digital assets. That includes things like SAAS websites, eCommerce stores, Amazon FBAs, domain portfolios, and any other types of profitable work from anywhere online businesses. If you’re interested in running the kind of internet businesses we explore here on the podcast, but you don’t know where or how to get started, Latona’s could be an incredible resource.

You can buy an already operational internet business, which means you don’t have to start from scratch, which is pretty darn cool. Starting from scratch is a ton of work. Of course, if you are one of those people who started from scratch and now you’ve got yourself a successful internet business, Latona’s can help you too. They’ve got a huge community of people looking to purchase businesses just like yours, which means they can help you get the best price. So whether you’re looking to buy or sell an internet business, be sure to talk to the team at Latona’s. Find them on their website latonas.com. That’s L-A-T-O-N-A-S.com. So the big question in front of us right now is the question of success versus luck in entrepreneurship.

Spoiler alert. By the end of this episode, we’re still not going to have a definitive answer to that question, but we’ll have some interesting additional data points and maybe a different way of approaching the question itself. And to get us started, I want to zero in on what’s usually referenced as one of the biggest if not the biggest aspects of luck and entrepreneurship which is of course, timing. After all if today’s guest Bo, were living in say 1492, he simply couldn’t have developed Tripod. It just wasn’t possible. The entrepreneurial opportunity wasn’t there in the same way it was 500 years later in 1992, which is when he first launched the service.

Bo Peabody:

So I first discovered computers thanks to my mom, who was an executive at a company that ran conferences on new technology. So that was lucky. We had a computer at home and I learned about them and cared about them. When I got to college, I noticed something when I got there for the first month and I was getting to know people and hanging out in the dorms. And I noticed that in every room, there was a computer. In every bedroom, there was a computer. At least one, a computer for every person roughly, but there was only one television. Maybe sometimes in an entire dorm, there would be one television. Maybe some kids who liked to watch sports would have them in their dorm rooms, but very rarely. And by the way, people weren’t just using the computer for work. They were using it for entertainment, to get information. They weren’t just writing papers and researching papers. And so I just thought to myself, “This thing is the next medium for information and for entertainment.”

Aaron Dinin:

Okay. So it’s lucky that Bo grew up in a household that had a computer. It wasn’t always the case back then. And by the way, 30 something years later, it’s still not always the case right now. Where you’re born and where you live is a big part of luck too. And it’s lucky Bo was going to college right as people were starting to have computers in every dorm room. A few years before, that simply wouldn’t have been the case. It’s also lucky that Bo happened to be taking a class with a professor named Mark Taylor.

Bo Peabody:

I was studying political science and philosophy, and so I was spending a lot of time looking at media as a political and cultural tool. So I was reading a lot of postmodern philosophy. A lot of [inaudible 00:07:49], a lot of philosophy. There was a guy named Mark Taylor who’s a famous political philosopher and media guy, my mentor. And so I was just spending a lot of time thinking about media. And that’s what led me to think about these new mediums. He was constantly immersing us in thinking about the internet, and what it means to have everybody in the world connected. And it was powerful ideas in an academic form that I then translated into a commercial form, because that was how my brain worked. I’d had businesses since I was eight years.

Aaron Dinin:

So Mark C. Taylor is a well-known postmodern religious and cultural critic. For a while, he was a professor at Williams College where Bo was going to school, though he did eventually move over to Columbia in 2007 where he chaired the department of religion. Now right as Bo would have been taking classes with him, Professor Taylor was experimenting with some groundbreaking work to bring digital technologies into traditional classrooms. For example, in 1992, alongside a finished philosopher, Professor Taylor used early teleconferencing technologies to teach a seminar with participants worldwide. I realize in our current world of Zoom meetings and companies with completely remote teams, that surely doesn’t sound very interesting.

But again, this was 1992 and we could probably say it was lucky that Bo was being exposed to those kinds of things in the classroom. It was a right place, right time scenario. And without those luck factors, I think it’s less likely that Bo launches Tripod. At the same time, Bo certainly wasn’t the only person wandering around dorms as computers were first beginning to jockey with TVs for the attention of college students. And he wasn’t the only person taking classes from professors who were excited about the shifting technological landscape. So for Bo to recognize the paradigm shift occurring, realized there was an opportunity and take action. None of that was luck. That was intelligence, right? It was him being an entrepreneur. Unless of course, you think being entrepreneurial is lucky too.

Bo Peabody:

I believe entrepreneurs are born, they’re not made. And I liken it to art. Art flows out of you. It’s not contrived or someone doesn’t sit down one day and say, “I’m going to be an artist.” They may sit down someday and say, “I’m going to devote my life to art,” but it’s in them that desire. And that’s the way I believe it is with entrepreneurs. I think it’s a mistake to go and think that you can become an entrepreneur. People do it obviously, but I think from the very beginning, as soon as I could have a business, I had one. And I never didn’t have one ever from when I was eight until now.

Aaron Dinin:

I got to say hope that’s not true, because I’m someone who makes my living teaching entrepreneurship. So I like to think it’s teachable, but I will admit I get frustrated when I hear students say I want to be an entrepreneur in the same way they might say I want to be a lawyer or I want to be a doctor. I find myself constantly having to remind them that entrepreneur isn’t a profession.

Bo Peabody:

And we should remember by the way, it wasn’t until the last 20 years or 30 years maybe that the word entrepreneur was cool. I mean it used to conjure up images of your crazy uncle in the basement, trying to invent some new type of peanut butter. It’s been a very new thing that kids say, “I want to be an entrepreneur.” It used to be I want to be a doctor. I want to be an astronaut. I want to be … and now entrepreneurs are celebrities, but that’s a new thing.

Aaron Dinin:

Yeah, entrepreneurial used to be a euphemism for unemployed.

Bo Peabody:

Yeah, exactly. I can remember my now wife when I first met her, I described myself as an entrepreneur and she said, “All I was thinking was …” So it is a euphemism for unemployed often.

Aaron Dinin:

By the way that huge laugh from Bo was in conjunction with him positioning his forefinger and thumb in the shape of an L, as in loser and holding it up to his forehead, which is as he notes, what his future wife thought of him on their first encounter. I won’t try to speak for her as to whether or not she considers it lucky that she ignored the warning signs, and went ahead and married an entrepreneur anyway. Whatever the case as with most entrepreneurial ventures, I’m sure the early days of Bo’s career with Tripod were rough as they tried to attract attention to what was essentially one of the first digital magazines, which by the way, was the original vision for the company.

Bo Peabody:

We called them online magazines. So it wasn’t an actual print magazine, but it started as a not very interactive publisher of content. But back then, the web wasn’t very interactive. The first time you could enter something into it form and submit it and have something come back, that was revolutionary. It used to be just images on a page. And what was cool about it is that you didn’t have to print the paper and anybody could look at it. It was the philosophy of it being totally democratized, and then anybody could be a publisher was how the whole thing started. And then once it started to get interactive is when it got really interesting. And we built a lot of those interactive tools ourselves. None of that stuff was off the shelf in 1994 and 1995.

Aaron Dinin:

And of course, one of those interactive tools that Bo and his team were creating was that home page builder tool you heard about at the start of this episode. It was an experimental tool for letting people publish their own content. While it had nothing to do with the original vision for the company, lucky for Bo, it took off in a huge way in part because it was launched at the right time.

Bo Peabody:

It was popular because there weren’t a lot of places to go on the web. I mean we were one of the first couple hundred sites that were around. I mean I remember saying back in ’94, ’95, you could surf the entire web in one day. There wasn’t a lot out there. And it wasn’t until Tripod and GeoCities that the explosion of sites, because you handed the publishing tools to people. And then all of a sudden the web went from being hundreds of sites to being hundreds of thousands of sites. And most of them were terrible because there were a picture of people’s cats, but many of them were more interesting than what we were publishing because we were just enabling the creativity. And that’s really the moment that we just realized that all of this content that we’re publishing, who cares?

Aaron Dinin:

Sure. When Bo tells the story that way, I’ll admit it sounds a lot like luck. But I think that’s because he’s taking 60 seconds to describe months of elapsed time in the moment, the decision to pivot away from their original vision of being a content publisher to becoming infrastructure that enabled other publishers. Well, that took a lot longer than 60 seconds to decide. And the reason it took so much time was because a lot of thought went into the switch. May have been lucky that the homepage builder was something people wanted, but it took a smart decision to turn that initial popularity into a huge business like Tripod.

Bo Peabody:

I think we were smart enough to take advantage of that home page builder. Putting it up was lucky, but riding it was smart. In fact, I probably held on for a couple months longer than I should have, but I pretty quickly I had a lot of people inside the company telling me we have to keep producing our own content. It’s what the advertisers want. It’s what people want. And I just said, “No, we’re going to just let the people produce the content.” And I probably held on to the content thing for a couple of few months longer than I should have, but ultimately I said, “We’re not spending any money on this. We’re putting all the money to people producing their own webpages.”

Aaron Dinin:

See what I mean? It was a smart decision to focus on the webpage builder at the expense of the rest of the business. And if you’re thinking, “Yeah, well any idiot could have seen how much more popular the website building stuff was, and would have pivoted to that,” I’ll take a moment to I guess call myself an idiot. In my last company, we had a similar kind of experiment gone right moment where we released a plugin for Gmail that got hugely popular within a few weeks. I’m talking thousands upon thousands of new users signing up every day. But that popular plugin wasn’t the core of our business, or at least what we thought was our business. And because it was free, much like Tripod’s homepage builder, we decided it was too much of a cost and a distraction to the company. So we shut it down.

Now to make a long story short, despite the huge popularity of the plugin we created, that company no longer exists. And in retrospect I feel like a giant idiot for not doing what Bo was smart enough to do. I didn’t listen to what the market end users were telling me. But enough about my stupidity for ignoring explosive growth. Let’s go back to Bo who unlike me, didn’t completely overlook the obvious success sitting right in front of him. This again, that’s actually harder to do than you might realize. Now rather than shutting it down, he and his team focused on growing that homepage builder as big as possible.

Bo Peabody:

We had this formula that turned out to be true, and we used to say it jokingly. But one person builds a website, they’re going to tell 10 of their friends to go visit it. I put up a website about my cars or my bike racing or whatever your hobby is. And they would tell at least 10 people to go visit it. And of those 10 people, one of those people would be interested in also building a page. It was the first viral product. At the bottom of the page, we would put powered by Tripod. And one out of every 10 people would click that and build a page. And then they would tell 10 and it was just boom, boom, boom. And the multiplier effect was extraordinary. I mean we grew to a million users in the first year. Back then those were big numbers.

Aaron Dinin:

I mean those were really big numbers for that time. I mean because there just wouldn’t have been that many users online back then. Right? So how did you keep up that kind of growth? What were you telling your team to do?

Bo Peabody:

Let’s focus on tools, better and better tools to allow people to publish their own content. And that’s when the arms race between Tripod and GeoCities began. And then there was another, so the third place player called Angelfire that we ended up buying, but it was really those three platforms that were allowing people to publish.

Aaron Dinin:

So we’ve got some really good ’90s internet names here. We got Tripod, Angelfire, GeoCities. Those are classic ’90s domains. So because I’m always really curious about this kind of stuff, where the heck did the name Tripod come from?

Bo Peabody:

That’s the worst name. Terrible name. And it came from before we really knew what the company was going to be, we just wanted a name that was nondescript and could really be anything. And Dick Sabot, rest his soul-

Aaron Dinin:

Dick Sabot by the way was Bo’s co-founder. He was also Bo’s professor, which is cool. And he was an early internet pioneer who unfortunately passed away in 2005.

Bo Peabody:

Dick Sabot said, “A tripod is like a very sturdy thing that you can’t knock over and we should name it something like that. More like a symbol.” So we named a Tripod and we talked about renaming the company so many times. Once we were growing fast, it was too hard to rename it. But I mean I’m sure Facebook felt the same way about their name for a long time. And then it just becomes part of the history and the vocabulary of the internet. And it wasn’t nearly as good a name as GeoCities

Aaron Dinin:

Here, Bo was talking about Tripod competitor and friend of the podcast, David Bonnet, founder of GeoCities. We explore the story of GeoCities alongside David back in episode number seven. GeoCities as Bo mentioned, was the other big company at the time offering personal websites. And they were also growing incredibly fast. So as you might imagine, there was definitely a friendly rivalry going on between Massachusetts based Tripod in California based GeoCities as they competed for growth.

Bo Peabody:

This is where things became very interesting and difficult from a business perspective, because people were publishing whatever they wanted. And as we all know, unsavory content tends to be leading in new technologies. And I’m going to throw David under the bus a little bit here. I love David Bonnet by the way. He and I, I haven’t talked to him in a long time, but he and I became friends when we were competing. And the big difference between how Tripod handled that and how GeoCities handled that was a decision that was a bad business decision, but the right ethical decision. We basically did not allow the pornographers to colonize Tripod. We had two people with FBI clearance on staff. We were doing some of the first reverse lookups of IP addresses. We put down case law with [inaudible 00:21:23].

We had people arrested. I mean we were absolutely focused on not allowing these people to publish stuff. And GeoCities basically was like publish away, and they literally grew 10 times as fast as we did in that year. And they took what for them maybe was the right philosophical approach, which was hey, it’s the internet. Hey, it’s creativity we’re not going to judge it. And we said … that, we’re judging this cause we know it’s bad. And it was a big decision for us to do that, and one that I’m very proud of. But one that I look back on as a steward of capital for investors, and our outcome was much smaller than GeoCities in part because of that.

Aaron Dinin:

Now we’ve got Bo explaining why Tripod ultimately didn’t reach the scale it could have, had they been more liberal with the types of content they allowed. So is this luck? Would we call it bad luck? But it was intentional. So maybe it was good luck or skill or morality or ethics. By the way, since David is not here to defend himself, I’ll note that in our GeoCities episode he makes a point of emphasizing their policies around strict content policing. He even went so far as to lament the lack of content moderation on current digital media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. So in David’s mind, they heavily police content too. And these different perspectives probably bring us as close as we’re going to get to an answer about the relationship between luck and intelligence in entrepreneurship.

Honestly, a lot of it is more a question of perspective than anything else. Was GeoCities luckier than Tripod because it ultimately became worth more money? Was the founder smarter? Well, I suppose the answer to those kinds of questions depends on what you prioritize.

Bo Peabody:

There was another company that people don’t talk about anymore called the Globe. So there was really, I guess if I had to reframe it, there was really GeoCities, Tripod and the Globe and Angelfire was a fourth product, but it was almost like a Mom-and-pop business. And GeoCities went public and did amazingly well, and then sold to Yahoo. The Globe went public and we sold the business to Lycos. Those were the three outcomes. GeoCities went public and went to three billion or something, and then sold to Yahoo. We sold to Lycos, and then many of our investors who held Lycos stock did much better than the headline number. And then the Globe went public and then ultimately, went to zero and nobody made any money.

Aaron Dinin:

You brought up the sale to Lycos, which sounds like a pretty good outcome. Could you tell us a bit about how that happened and what it was like?

Bo Peabody:

So we got approached by Lycos toward the end of 1997, and we had grown fast. People don’t remember that in 1996, Goldman Sachs tried to take Wired Magazine public and it was a miserable failure. And the entire internet community and the financial community said this is a joke. This whole internet thing is a joke. When Goldman Sachs is trying to peddle a print magazine as an internet company, try to get it a 30 times revenue multiple it’s a joke. And it was nuclear winter for nine months in the financing market. And I happened to be out raising capital during that time, and I barely got it done. And I ended up raising a lot more money than I had wanted to or expected to because I was so fearful that something like that would happen again.

And so we had just raised capital and we probably six months after we had closed that round, and Lycos approached us. And we just thought there’s a lot of risk in this business model. And Lycos was willing to allow us to continue to run the business in the way that we wanted to. So it was like an acquisition, but it was mostly financial and not really operational. And as a first time entrepreneur at the age of 26 or seven, I just decided, “This is a good win. It’s a fair price, and I feel good about the return for the investors.” And so we decided to do it.

What happened though is that we decided to hire a banker, Morgan Stanley, to come in and help us to make sure that we were getting a fair price. And so this whole process starts, and we end up taking that one offer that we got from Lycos and turning it into four more offers and five, including Lycos. So we had Microsoft, Yahoo, Excite and AOL. And we decided to go with AOL. So we signed the term sheet with AOL, price was bigger, but the deal with them was the same. They were going to let us continue to run the business. And so I went down to Virginia after we had signed the term sheet and we were in the closing dorks, and had a great two days and hanging out with Steve Case and David Gang and a bunch of the guys that were there then.

And the end of the second day, they said, “Hey, we’ve got a real estate agent set up for you.” And I’m like, “What do you mean real estate agent?” Like, “Well, you’re going to move down here.” And I’m like, “Guys, it’s in the term sheet. I’m not moving anywhere. We’re not moving the business.” Yeah, but we figured you’d love it so much when he came down here that you’d want to move. And I’m like, “It’s not happening.” And the deal blew up over that. At the 11th hour, we blew the deal up. We went back to Lycos and we said, “We’re back.” And we ended up closing the deal with Lycos on New Year’s Eve day. The deal closed after all night negotiation. And we called them I think two days after Christmas and we said, “Hey, the AOL deal fell apart. We’re back.”

And they said, “Get in your car, be at the office in Boston. And we’re not leaving until we sign it.” Because we had left them at the alter and Bob Davis, who’s an amazing guy was who was like, “You’re staying in this room until it’s done.” And we did. We stayed there all night and negotiated the deal.

Aaron Dinin:

A lot of the entrepreneurs I’ve spoken with who had an acquisition felt freely constricted after they got acquired. Did you feel that way at Lycos, or did they give you a lot of freedom to keep innovating?

Bo Peabody:

As much as I enjoyed the building of Tripod as an independent entity, I ended up spending two years there. But it was really the first 18 months that I spend with Bob and with the whole team there, Dave Peterson who ran sales, Ted Phillips the CFO. Just an amazing group of entrepreneurs. And we got to not only build Tripod, but we integrated into all aspects of the Lycos network. And so it grew a heck of a lot faster than it would have on its own. And after about six months, Bob and I were sitting there and he said, “Well, Tripod is fully integrated, it’s profitable. You did what you told me you would do. What do you want to do now? You’ve still got 18 months left on your contract. What do you want to do?” And I said, “Well, I’d love to help you build the broader company because it was a public company. And so I’d love to get exposure to that.”

And so he said, “Great, let’s make you the vice president of network. And we’re going to execute this M&A strategy, and I want you to be the advanced person who goes and talks to these entrepreneurs and tells them how great it is to be part of Lycos.” And it was a perfect job because I actually felt incredibly good about that message, because we had had an awesome experience being acquired and they had just let us do our thing. And so I basically traveled around the country. We acquired 20 businesses in the next year. It was insane. And then during that time, we launched Tripod in five countries in Europe in the native language of those countries. So that was the other project that I was working on.

Aaron Dinin:

So you see, it’s not really a question of being lucky or smart. Sure Tripod didn’t have the same type of exit as its biggest competitor, GeoCities, but Bo came away with an incredible experience at Lycos. Would he have gotten that same experience if you’d had sold to AOL or if he’d gone public? Who knows? Certainly there’s no way he could have known. So I guess we could call it lucky, but I think it’s a better argument for what I’ve mentioned earlier, which is that perspective plays as big a role in the relationship between lucky and smart as anything else. Bo could look back on his time at Lycos and think, “Gosh, I wish I’d gotten more money for Tripod.” Or he could look back on his time at Lycos and think, “You know what? I had an amazing experience working with some amazing people and that was a worthwhile trade off in exchange for the money I maybe didn’t get.”

Similarly, we can look at Bo’s story and call him unlucky for not getting more money, or we could call him lucky for getting a fulfilling professional experience. So I guess what I’m saying here is the question of lucky versus smart in entrepreneurship is a pointless question. And I love Bo’s story and the story of Tripod because it underscores just how inseparable the two things are. In other words, for Tripod to happen, Bo needed to be both lucky and smart. And in a lot of ways, I think that’s the true hallmark of an entrepreneur. They’re lucky enough to identify the opportunity, and smart enough to be able to figure out how to capitalize on the opportunities when they come along. And if Bo’s story of Tripod isn’t enough to convince you of that, how about the story of what Bo has been working on since Tripod.

Bo Peabody:

If you look at my LinkedIn profile, you can see that I’ve owned a restaurant for 25 years. And the story behind that is that in 1996 when I had probably 30 or maybe 40 people at the company, remember we were in this tiny town. And this woman and her husband show up from I guess they, at the time they might have been living in Chicago or something. But anyway, they showed up in Williamstown and started this 40-seat restaurant. And six months after they started it, my company was 50% of their revenue because every single night at 8:30, we would pour out of our office and walk down to Mezze and live it up every night. We had every recruiting dinner there, every birthday party, every celebration, everything. It was the coolest place.

And a year after they started it for a variety of reasons that are interesting and funny, they had to split up the asset between the two of them. They were getting divorced, which isn’t funny, but it was amicable. And what they found when they went to split up the asset was that his mother, who had been doing the books, never paid any taxes. And so they said, “We got to close the business.” And I’m like, “Guys, if you close, I close. This is our place. I can’t run my company without this restaurant.” It was the backbone of so much of what we did, and so I ended up buying his half in exchange for paying the back taxes.

And that’s how I ended up in the restaurant business, which has now become a huge part of my life. It’s what I’m focused on now in my career the last five years is all about hospitality and hospitality technology. And that started by a very funny and interesting set of circumstances,

Aaron Dinin:

Purely by chance, Bo became a restaurant tour as a result of building Tripod. And that led him to his current venture, a tech company for restaurants called Seated. As of August 18th, 2020, which was about three months prior to my conversation with him, Seated announced a $30 million fundraising round, which I guess means something is going right for them. Or they’re really, really, really lucky. And judging by my conversation with Bo, I’m pretty sure it’s certainly not all because of luck. But lucky for us, he was willing to share his and Tripod’s story. So I want to give him a huge thanks for taking the time. If you’d like to learn more about what Bo is working on these days, you can check him out on Twitter. He’s @bopeabody.

I’m on Twitter too, I’m @aarondinin that’s A-A-R-O-N D-I-N-I-N. And I also write lots of articles about entrepreneurship, including some articles about the role luck plays. You can find all of that on medium.com. Just search for my name over there.

This podcast is on Twitter. We’re @WebMastersPod. Please send us any thoughts or feedback you have about the episode if you enjoyed it. And I hope you did. Please subscribe on your podcasting app of choice. And maybe while you’re there, leave us a nice review. And if you really liked the episode or honestly, even if you hated it, please tell your friends because unlike free Tripod websites, there’s not a lot of good built-in virality mechanisms for podcasts beyond you all the listeners sharing them with other people.

Now before I go, I want to give a thanks to Ryan Higgs, our sound engineer for keeping these episodes sounding so good.

I also want to thank our sponsor Latona’s, for making these episodes possible. Remember if you’re interested in buying or selling an internet business, be sure to check out latonas.com. And lastly, a big thanks to all of you for listening.

We’ll be back again soon with another episode featuring another great web pioneer. But until then, well I guess it’s time for me to sign off.